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It's well established that creationism has no place here. I completely agree, but I came across a question which, so far as I can tell, is asking for examples of situations where evolution is an unlikely explanation. The question seems quite popular, which is surprising given its lack of clarity and the fact that it's asking for a list of things that don't exist. Should such questions be closed?

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  • $\begingroup$ hmm, the question was closed 2 minutes after I posted this... I guess that answers that. $\endgroup$
    – Shep
    May 8 '12 at 9:55
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    $\begingroup$ What exactly is the problem with asking questions of evolutionary theory? This does not need to imply any sort of creationism. I agree that the question is not well put and is rather vague, but we should not discourage people from asking questions of our scientific paradigms. $\endgroup$
    – Poshpaws
    May 8 '12 at 12:07
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    $\begingroup$ Fair enough, it's a bit speculative of me to assume this has any ties to creationism. But it did more or less ask "why / how is evolution wrong?" in a way that doesn't allow the answer "it isn't". These sorts of questions tend to get undue attention. I'm not advocating censorship or scientific dogma, I'm asking how far we need to go to control them. $\endgroup$
    – Shep
    May 8 '12 at 12:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Shep - I'd strongly advise not jumping to conclusions. There are plenty of people with zero relationship to/belief n creationism who would be greatly interested in areas where evolutionary explanations are not currently known, from those like me who are laymen generally like reading about evolution but are more fascinated with unexplained than well known; to - hopefully - serious evolution researchers looking for interesting topics of study. $\endgroup$
    – DVK
    Aug 19 '12 at 0:50
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    $\begingroup$ @Shep - also, from someone who comes from physics background, I would strongly suggest an inoculation against self-smug "We know everything" attitude in the form of Lord Kelvin's infamous "two minor clouds" speech. It's one of the more fascinating events in history of science IMHO. $\endgroup$
    – DVK
    Aug 19 '12 at 0:52
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I've closed it as not constructive now, I remember voting to close that question, but that was before I became a moderator and the close vote decayed as we didn't reach 5 votes.

The "most difficult to explain" is a very vague and subjective criterium, that question is just not a good fit for a Q&A site.

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  • $\begingroup$ I was a bit surprised by the lack of close votes, actually, but I guess close vote decay explains it. $\endgroup$
    – Shep
    May 8 '12 at 10:00

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