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In the guidelines of asking questions it is said that the op should show some previous research. I would like to want should be written in questions whose googling or Wikipedia doesn't show any literature about it?

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    $\begingroup$ If you searched Wikipedia, you could add the relevant link to that wiki page. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jul 23 '17 at 21:55
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    $\begingroup$ This question hasn't been closed. Perhaps that's the model you should use... $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jul 27 '17 at 17:24
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I think the request for "research" has less to do with necessarily looking for an answer to the problem, and more to do with showing that you understand what the problem actually is.

I very much dislike the questions that ask a simple question and then say "I haven't found anything so please help."

I hope @canadianer doesn't mind me using their example and disagreeing heavily that there is "no research effort", see: Can beavers control the direction a tree falls?

There isn't any attempt there to find an answer, but it shows a good description of the problem, including an explanation of how humans would make strategic cuts, good reasoning for why such behavior might be useful to a beaver, and picture evidence that shows what could be a hinge made by the beaver.

Similarly: Why is EcoRI supplied with a unique buffer when it is allegedly 100% active in universal buffers?

This question contains information on the buffer provided with EcoR1, and examples of two other buffers said to work fine with EcoR1 and yet not packaged with it. Honestly, I care nothing at all about EcoR1, it doesn't come up in my research ever, I don't care much about it except for its importance in the history of biology, but the question was interesting because with just the information in the question, it was clear that a) these solutions are fairly similar with some differences, and b) the answer isn't immediately obvious. If the question had no body, it would look like @canadianer wasn't actually interested or curious in the answer, but maybe just had that as a question on a lab exam or something.

This all counts to me as "research" even if it isn't "I searched Google and found nothing..." I think it's sometimes okay to have Googleable questions here, as long as they aren't just incredibly dull and boring questions (for example, questions that are effectively requesting a definition are always boring to me).

For you specifically, a lot of your questions don't have much background or basis. It doesn't make sense why you want to know an answer besides curiosity or maybe studying for an exam. If you can't find an answer, at least try to motivate why it's worth someone's time to answer your question.

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    $\begingroup$ Well, what a role model I am. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jul 26 '17 at 4:57
  • $\begingroup$ I generally agree, though I'm somewhat torn between my opposition to overzealous closing and bad questions. Perhaps that "How to Ask" blurb that appears when you start to ask a question should give some pointers on what makes a good question such as context and evidence of familiarity with the subject. As you say, I don't really care if any research has actually been done so long as it is clear that the asker has a genuine interest in the question. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jul 26 '17 at 5:06
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    $\begingroup$ On that note, perhaps it is time to re-re-re-re-think that godawful homework close reason (somewhat in the vein of this post, though not necessarily that wording). There are pros and cons to this as people have articulated and, no matter how often it is discussed nothing gets changed, so maybe such a reconsideration is fruitless anyways. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jul 26 '17 at 5:15
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You could explain "I have tried searching the web and Wikipedia and I haven't found any literature about it", and add what search terms you have used, that at least shows previous research. Add a link, or links, to any pages that you feel would be useful to illustrate how you are getting some of the way to answering your question, but how they don't quite do it for you.

Importantly though I would also add my thoughts/intuition about the subject to at least show that I have done some thinking about it, this also has the desired effect of maybe showing where you have become 'stuck' in your thought processes which may help the answerer to shape their answer for you.

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    $\begingroup$ -1 here. That one sentence is not enough. A link is much better. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jul 23 '17 at 21:56
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    $\begingroup$ A link to what though? $\endgroup$ – Martin Hügi Jul 24 '17 at 3:59
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with you. Buy that can easily be misused.. $\endgroup$ – Anubhav Goel Jul 24 '17 at 22:16
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    $\begingroup$ Personally, if a user with 2500+ reputation adds this line to their question I would take them at their word. Which is what they have asked. In fact for me probably a user with 300+ and I'd give them the benefit of the doubt. I'll edit my answer to add what it is you are searching for, as this can often be the reason that nothing turns up $\endgroup$ – Martin Hügi Jul 25 '17 at 7:53
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    $\begingroup$ 3/4 of my (brilliant) questions show no research effort and yet weren't closed, so presumably there is some reputation cut-off where people don't bother you anymore. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jul 25 '17 at 16:53

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