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I have a question about my Biology Stack Exchange post: Do women also love men's chest/nipples at same extent as men's love for women's breasts?

I really don't understand which part of my question is not fitting to this site? I really worked hard, read a lot of articles to ask this question, because I really want to know the reality. But now that my question is closed, I'm feeling hopeless and I don't know what to do. This thing is really important to me. I thought this is the right site on SE network where people would understand the question and will answer it. But I was really surprised and sad when it was closed. I feel very bad and sad when I have a genuine question and I can't find its answer anywhere on the Internet.

So is there any way I can improve my question and get the answer? Is there something specific that can be removed or changed or described better? Is there any other way to ask this question so ultimately I get answer to my original doubts?

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    $\begingroup$ Imo the moderator (the person with the diamond behind their name) handling your original linked post has given you ample feedback on your question. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Mar 2 at 20:07
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    $\begingroup$ Cross-posting similar poorly received questions and meta questions across the SE network is discouraged and may eventually be treated as trolling. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Mar 3 at 8:02
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with @AliceD. Your question is opinion-based, and explicitly off-topic. Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 3 at 20:11
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    $\begingroup$ Why does someone trying to improve their question get downvoted? $\endgroup$ Mar 3 at 20:19
  • $\begingroup$ @FranckDernoncourt voting is different on meta. It's more a reflection of whether you agree with the premise of the question or the idea being presented than it is of whether or not you think it's a good question. That's why meta votes don't affect your reputation score, either here or on main. See this. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 3 at 20:22
  • $\begingroup$ @MattDMo but this question isn't tagged feature-request? $\endgroup$
    – Ooker
    Mar 5 at 16:34
  • $\begingroup$ @Ooker other than that, I can't speculate why people downvoted - I didn't. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 6 at 22:42
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In my opinion, I find this sentence, said by @theforestecologist, is the only helpful feedback for the OP:

your question's premise (does somebody love something) is subjective and opinion-based

The rest of the feedback the OP received only centers on this one. However, this important point is still unclear from the perspective of the OP. We have to respect this perspective. If someone can elaborate on why that premise is subjective, then the OP would be much less confusing. But it seems that no one does that; only continuing them that the question is subjective. I think in their perspective they are doing exactly what they are suggested, to their best. Of course their best is not enough, but telling them to do the thing they have already done will only confuse them.

I think in this case, both sides are victims of the illusion of transparency. If one frequents many sites one can see this phenomenon happens occasionally. I don't know why, but surely it decreases our satisfaction on learning and helping. I guess until we have a concrete theory about subjectivity, we cannot solve this once and for all.

To feedbackers: Perhaps asking Socratic questions is a better approach. Quoting the line you find unclear/unscientific/subjective will make your feedback much clearer than just stating the question unclear/unscientific/subjective. If you find the question is unsaveable, then probably be much helpful to emphasizing OP's lack of background, and recommend them to read an introductory material. If you want OP to be specific in asking question, then you need to be specific first in giving feedback.

To OP: I encourage you to read a literature review on "sexually attractive", or else you will never find the necessary vocabulary to describe their problem. @theforestecologist also links you to Pawlowski, B.A. and Sorokowski, P., 2008. Men's attraction to women's bodies changes seasonally. Perception, 37(7), pp.1079-1085. You can start from this. In this site it's likely you will get answered from complex studies anyway. If you feel like there is a knowledge gap, then asking for introductory material is perfectly fine. I encourage you to ask another question on Psychology & Neuroscience about introductory material for "sexual attraction". I would be surprise if it's closed again

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  • $\begingroup$ "Men's attraction to women's bodies changes seasonally" I'm not concerned about this. All I know is men are interested in women's breasts whether it's winter, autumn or summer. And that's a fundamental thing for my question. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 14:33
  • $\begingroup$ And can you please help how can I apply Socratic questions approach for my question? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ I'm really frustrated when everyone else is getting answers and I can't get answer for a genuine question which obviously has truth. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 14:39
  • $\begingroup$ I once struggled with a question many years ago, where I faced similar problems. Everyone was downvoting and calling it opinion based. Then a user with good reputation really helped me and edited my question himself without losing context and what I wanted to ask, and guess what my question got answered. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 14:50
  • $\begingroup$ I understand. However, I don't have any expertise in this topic. Have you read any literature review on "sexually attractive"? That article may not answer what you are looking for, but may provide links to what you are looking for $\endgroup$
    – Ooker
    Mar 3 at 16:18
  • $\begingroup$ The text you and theforestecologist gave me confused me. Is it a book name? What are those numbers and random texts? Further, I want you to know that I can't understand complex studies which involves maths or deep scientifc logics. Is it simple English article that I can understand? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @vivek it's a standard way in academic to provide information about research papers. The first bit, "Pawlowski, B.A. and Sorokowski, P." is the authors. The second bit, "2008", is the year the paper published. The third bit, "Men's attraction to women's bodies changes seasonally" is the title of the paper. The next to last bit, "Perception" is the journal it published. The last bit, "37(7), pp.1079-1085" is the issue number and page number to find the research paper in the journal. $\endgroup$
    – Ooker
    Mar 3 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ In this site it's likely you will get answered from complex studies anyway. If you feel like there is a knowledge gap, then asking for introductory material is perfectly fine. I encourage you to ask another question on Psychology & Neuroscience about introductory material for "sexual attraction". I would be surprise if it's closed again $\endgroup$
    – Ooker
    Mar 3 at 18:46
  • $\begingroup$ thanks. Also, like I had said, this paper is another example of more emphasis given on what men love! There is something for sure. That's why I asked it on Psychology SE. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 4 at 5:15
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Also, if I use the word love, like, by these word(s), I mainly mean: finding sexually attractive

Then don't say "love". Say "find sexually attractive". Why introduce terminology that you redefine for your question when that terminology has a lot of other baggage attached?

"Do women find the male chest sexually attractive?" seems like a reasonable question to me; it could be answered empirically with a survey approach asking women about physical traits they find attractive. You'd be mistaken to take any of these results as universal or describing any individual, of course. That said, I don't think it belongs on Biology because it doesn't ask about any underlying biology, but I feel it could fit on Psychology.

However, your question has a lot of other rambling junk in it. You go on and on about "hot girls" in movies, personal anecdotes, etc. Why? This is not helpful, it has nothing to do with your core question.

The majority of your question focuses on men's attraction to women's breasts; while it may be reasonable to establish this to ground your question, none of the elaboration is necessary or relevant to the core question. Neither are the parts about stimulation of women's breasts being sexually arousing. If you want to ask about arousal experienced by men from nipple stimulation, then that's a separate question, not related to your title. Keep SE questions focused on one question and one question only.

If yes, why don't we hear/see/listen much about it

This is a purely opinion-based question that has nothing to do with biology, or really psychology for that matter. Leave it out.

If no, why (I assume you would say it's all mostly culture based)?

This also cannot be answered in any scientific way. One can speculate, but it's hard enough to scientifically answer "why" questions for things that exist, let alone those that do not. Leave this out.


Lastly, you've been, from my perspective, quite pushy and rude. You've asked this question 4 times on 3 different sites within just a few hours, and hardly responded to any feedback you've gotten except to complain it's not valid. Listen to feedback you get and try to understand it. Be patient: you were complaining on Skeptics.SE about not getting an answer on Biology Meta helping you with your question not even 2 hours after you posted here. Users here are not at your call, they're volunteering their time and expertise.

There is also a tendency for people to come to some of these sites and ask sexual questions for their own personal titillation. They're not looking for an answer to the question they claim to be asking, they actually just want to talk about sexuality with people on the internet. If you want to ask a science question about sexuality, keep to the science, otherwise it appears you have other motives.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not doing any research on this topic and neither I'm science student. I'm just normal guy. What my purpose of finding out the truth I will surely reveal. Don't worry :) Now regarding your last sentence, other motives like? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ And sorry to say, I'm not of those guys who want to talk about sexuality online. If it were the case, I wouldn't spend so much time on it. I'm merely talking I think, most time I'm spending is fixing my question and reading articles online. That's what I know. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 17:57
  • $\begingroup$ And I would upvote your answer for giving specific feedback, but I'm not able. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 18:00
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You have received apt feedback on the main question on the main site. Now you post it here and additionally on a related stack, i.e., Psych & Neurosci and on the Meta site over there as well - why start the same cycle again? Bio and Neuro are similar sites, both are scientific stacks and the ample comments provided here also apply there and vice versa. This kind of question fits better on Reddit or similar sites. There requirements are less stringent and opinion based questions lacking a firm scientific framework are happily answered.

Note that cross-posting across the SE network is discouraged and may eventually be received as trolling.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is Reddit trustworthy? I always feel Reddit is like social media, where people just comment, there's not much truth. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ And also I feel here users have more knowledge and experience than social media like Reddit. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ @vivek I agree, we deal with scientifically based questions that can be answered in a scientific way. That is why this type of question doesn't fit the site. That's exactly why we discourage opinion-based questions that will eventually end up in futile discussions. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Mar 3 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that's why I really prefer I could somehow get answers here instead @AliceD. But I don't know why it's not working. I have tried to edit again and again but not working. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:24
  • $\begingroup$ OK, to be frank - take it elsewhere. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Mar 3 at 8:25
  • $\begingroup$ How can you say it's opinion based? Is men's love for breasts opinion based? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:26
  • $\begingroup$ I have made my point Vivek. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Mar 3 at 8:26
  • $\begingroup$ But that doesn't say men's love for breasts opinion based. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:27
  • $\begingroup$ Do you have any proof? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:27
  • $\begingroup$ Men's love for breasts isn't opinion based at all. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 3 at 8:29
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    $\begingroup$ @vivek you can't say that at all. First off, you're completely neglecting men who are not attracted to women, who may care nothing about women's breasts at all. And within the population of men who are attracted to women, the range of attractiveness (please don't use the word "love") to breasts varies tremendously. For some men, breasts are the only thing they care about, while others are attracted to them and other features, while still others care very little for them. This is why your question is opinion-based, because you simply can't group "men" into a single, homogenous category. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 6 at 22:51
  • $\begingroup$ @MattDMo if you see my original question, I put a lot of effort and time while writing phrases like "so many men" and "compared to number of women" etc. I didn't say at all in my question that all men are attracted. So the reason you have given here is not convincing. Is there any other reason? $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 9 at 6:17
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    $\begingroup$ @vivek multiple people have tried giving you feedback, telling you why your question is off-topic on this site. I'm sorry it's not convincing to you, but they have given the correct reasons. If you refuse to be bound by the rules and norms of this site, there's nothing I or anyone can do for you. I would advise you to stop asking this question and its variants, like the one you just posted. It's only going to get closed again, for exactly the same reason, and no amount of arguing on your part will change it. These questions are off-topic. Period. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 9 at 18:31
  • $\begingroup$ @MattDMo the problem is why is it that only I am asking these questions? Everyone seeing against me makes me feel there's something wrong with me, because everyone seems disagree with what I want to figure out through my questions, even though in real life everyone would feel just like what I feel about this topic. So it makes me doubt - I'm only one here asking such questions and maybe something is wrong with me. $\endgroup$
    – vivek
    Mar 12 at 5:34
  • $\begingroup$ @vivek as has been pointed out to you repeatedly, your questions are off-topic on this particular website, therefore you are not in the right place to be asking them. There are a million other places to choose from - I suggest you do so. Whining and complaining about "there must be something wrong with me" aren't going to get you anywhere. Take some initiative and find a more suitable site. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Mar 13 at 0:46

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