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Ok, I've read people's comments and made what I thought were necessary updates: The text was likely too long. As a result, I copied the detailed version from my original question post above to the species-identification tag info page. I now link to this info page directly in the Tag warning text. (Links do work here). I also removed #5 ("Indication of ...


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1 I agree that species-identification questions are coming in with clearly no research effort. To be honest, I've noticed this for a while and wanted to propose we "crack down" harder on species-identification questions like we do with other tags, but I was conflicted b/c I enjoy the steady flow of puzzles questions ;). However, I think most of us are ...


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I'll mostly just address your point #2 here, I'll let others weigh in on #1. I'm not as concerned as you with closing as duplicates being a problem. In my opinion, the purpose of closing as duplicate is to direct the question asker to the original question, and to prevent clutter on the site. I don't think of closing as duplicate as punishment to the asker ...


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Closing as a duplicate is very different from other closure reasons. All the other closure reasons are "Your question is some kind of bad." Closing as a duplicate is "Your question is good: in particular, we already have answers to it." If a question is a duplicate, it should be closed as one. It doesn't matter that the asker had no way of finding the ...


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For those want to identify a specimen, yet could not find out a guideline. There are a lots of interesting questions on identify X. But that often have a deficit of proper information. However I have tried to made one sample, using common sense. In General: Try to photograph describe useful characteristics, such as possible good fingerprints. Though it ...


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Given that I've answered more ID questions than anyone else on Bio.SE to this point, I suppose I should make a comment. *grumble grumble* revealing trade secrets... *grumble grumble* :p. Short answer: Many common species (especially cosmopolitan ones) get asked a lot. Many of us know these species well. Otherwise...No rock is left unturned!! If there's an ...


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If the organism is a pest or disease then it is much easier because it has been researched. Mentioning the location in a search is good too. Local information is good; for example somewhere I have a key to the 21 Eucalyptus species in Central Victoria, which is more useful there than a key to the 800 species in Australia. It isn't what I was formally taught, ...


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So, if I understand you correctly: The poster is concerned that people may be building up a ‘reputation’ of points without being an expert or having done the hard work of becoming an expert on species recognition. The poster feels that because he thinks everyone can use Google’s spy tool, SE Biology should stop accepting questions on species recognition. ...


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Some thoughts.... In general, having good overall knowledge of groups (orders/families etc) and their characteristics can quickly narrow down the answer set, which makes searching for traits more efficient and practical. Therefore, having a good overall background in e.g. entomology (or botany etc...) can allow you to relatively quickly arrive at the correct ...


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