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Why was the question Is the morphology of the insertion of the gluteus minimus to the greater trochanter acquired or innate? If acquired, what are the factors? closed as unclear?

No comment was left to ask for clarification, so I don't know what is unclear.


Copy of the question: Is the morphology of the insertion of the gluteus minimus to the greater trochanter acquired or innate? If acquired, what are the factors?:

{1} noted two different morphologies for the insertion of the gluteus minimus to the greater trochanter:

Two morphologies noted: The majority (11/14) were long, thin, and crescent shaped and ran medial to lateral and concave facing inferiorly, while a few (3/14) were bowtie in shape. [quote from Table 1 below from {1}]

Is the morphology of the insertion of the gluteus minimus to the greater trochanter acquired or innate? If acquired, what are the factors? If innate, which gene(s) are involved?

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References:

Screenshot:

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    $\begingroup$ For what it’s worth, I don’t think your question is broad or unclear. $\endgroup$
    – canadianer
    Sep 15 '19 at 21:59
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First off, there were comments placed, which are also shown on your screenshot:

comments

I see that I used the mod hammer, which I basically used because of a lack of research, following the first comment of John and the following comment from hello_there_andy. You noticed a phenomenon and leave it to the community to find out whether it is genetic, acquired, or both. It is an interesting question in itself, but too broad. The lack of prior research and its broadness may not be reflected in the ultimate close reason, namely 'unclear'. As a mod I often go with the flow and the previous voters probably voted that the Q was 'unclear' and if the majority of the voters chooses a particular reason, I mostly just follow through. In this case there was 'homework' vote and 'unclear' vote, so I couldn't follow the herd. Because the question is obvious not homework I chose to use 'unclear'. I might have done better by choosing my own first choice, namely 'too broad' or a custom reason, namely 'under-researched'.

FYI - Because of the downvotes, the Q would eventually have been auto-close and auto-removed by the bot anyway.

I hope this clarifies things somewhat.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, how can I make the question less broad? It seems already was narrower than most of the questions on this website. $\endgroup$ Sep 12 '19 at 7:23
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    $\begingroup$ @FranckDernoncourt by doing some research of your own. The topic is super specific, yet the Q is super broad - Are there studies known on your Q? What did you try looking for and where? What did you find so far? And not less important - Why do you want to know this? $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Sep 12 '19 at 7:39
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    $\begingroup$ I haven't found anything so far. I still don't understand why you considered the question was too broad. Also I don't see why I should add the reason why I'm asking the question. $\endgroup$ Sep 12 '19 at 7:40
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    $\begingroup$ Too broad because you ask If acquired, what are the factors? If innate, which gene(s) are involved? - there is no lead, no prior research, no pointers, no nothing. Adding background (why are you asking) provides background to the question which might place it in perspective. $\endgroup$
    – AliceD Mod
    Sep 12 '19 at 8:10
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    $\begingroup$ well I haven't indicated prior research simply because I haven't found anything. I don't think that makes the question too broad. Regarding the background, what's the point in adding a perspective? I'd prefer not to clutter the question and keep it focused. $\endgroup$ Sep 12 '19 at 18:19
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    $\begingroup$ There's a line in the help that reads "You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face" and there is also the issue of XY problems: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem - Motivating your question makes it more interesting to others and also helps people recognize XY problems. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause Mod
    Sep 12 '19 at 19:10

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